Archive for the 'good and bad practice' Category

we need your teaching skills – and not only in schools

Saturday, October 28th, 2017

Definition of teach: “cause (someone) to learn or understand something by example or experience.”

Definition of skill: “The ability to do something well; expertise.”

That’s what we are all about in all our volunteer projects

{As an aside we are proud that our programme is a skills-share programme. However, we need to use the term “volunteer” because in this Google search age the vast majority of people use the word “volunteer” when they do their searches – not “skills-share”.}

Many of our “education” volunteer programmes are not based in schools – many are.

All of our programmes need volunteers to share their skills – e.g. teach.

Here are some examples of where we need teaching skills – not only in schools but in community, health and vocational programmes too.

Please read on to learn more about the projects we work with that need and would warmly welcome your teaching skills .

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volunteer in Nepal – new projects and an old friend

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

We are working in Nepal again!

As many of you know we stopped working in Nepal a few years ago – firstly because of the legal issues of volunteers needing ( almost impossible to obtain ) work permits – and then post the devastation of the earthquake we felt it was inappropriate to send volunteers

Well HOORAY we can now announce that we are working again in Nepal.

Our programme causes no problem with work permits because all our volunteers are self funding skills-share volunteers

So take a look at the projects we are working with in Nepal

Education Support

Nursery school support

Business Skills

Business support in Patan

Child development in rural Nepal

Nursery support in Kathmandu 

Community Support

 

 

 

supporting people in developing countries – a video presentation

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

Dianne, our Volunteer Programme Adviser, has made a number of presentations about how to volunteer responsibly – here is one that she recently gave … and it’s not a sales pitch for people and places – rather a guide to the challenges of making sure you do more good than harm when you volunteer or donate. Dianne discusses building projects, wealth creation projects, education – as well as why it’s so important to avoid orphanages, and what alternatives are available to volunteers and donors.

see the video here

 

NEW! an easy and safe way to donate to your volunteer project

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

We do not ask or expect volunteers to donate more to the project they work with, other than the initial sum detailed in their placement costs.

But we are constantly humbled by the number of volunteers and their friends and families who wish to give additional support.

We are thrilled that now we have an easy, cost effective and safe way to help with those donations.

Our sister charity, Travel Philanthropy (Charity No 1122270), now enables us to offer this opportunity for each project and community where we work.

We are working with Total Giving – a CSR initiative – no fees are charged – much more money reaches the projects than through other traditional donation sites such as Just Giving.

HOW – simply visit the Travel Philanthropy page on Total Giving

Scan down the page to find your project – click on the image – and follow the donation instruction. Each project has an individual link, so you can give that link to your family and  friends – and they can find out more about the project and donate themselves.

 

we’re definitely doing some things right …

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

This from a volunteer whose placement in Cambodia has been confirmed:

“Thank you so much for your help and attentiveness throughout this process! I really enjoyed reading the testimonies from previous volunteers- they are very useful.”

just saying … I love my job :)

Wednesday, May 17th, 2017

Every now and again I feel especially proud of how we work here at ‘people and places’ … and welcome the appreciation of people we work with …
This just in from Hannah, who won’t be able to volunteer this year, but will be back !

“As you may have deduced, I have been extremely busy recently. So busy in fact that it may not be possible for me to go to Cambodia as I wished. Thank you so much for your help. Your website and guidance has been excellent. Very professional and informative. … I would absolutely go back to your website and recommend it to anyone I meet who is interested. … Best of luck with everything you have planned.
Thank you for all of your help.”

international accolades for Paul

Friday, April 21st, 2017

“This world is in desperate need of people like you, who always keep asking questions, care for others and are never afraid to say what needs to be said – but now we must soldier on without you.”
Freya Zandatra journalist

“A great guy…I will never forget sharing the panel with him at the WTM Africa conference in Cape Town and he opened his presentation by showing how disgraceful and unacceptable it was for South Africans to be attacking people from other African countries in Jo’burg. He was and continues to be my HERO. We lost a great person and will remember him for his contributions towards the poor and vulnerable.”
Adama Bah, tourism and development practitioner

“He was a pioneer and leader in fighting for social equality and justice through responsible tourism in Port Elizabeth. Through his unwavering dedication and passion he touched the lives of many people in his community and beyond to achieve lasting change for the better. ”
Claudia Eckhaert, tourism consultant

“Paul was a leading light in Responsible Tourism in South Africa – we should honour his memory by redoubling our efforts.”
Harold Goodwin, professor of responsible tourism
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school sixth forms or colleges – do you have links ?

Sunday, December 11th, 2016

I am hoping some of you can help me.  I have started going into schools to give talks to sixth form students about how to choose good volunteering projects for their gap year or student travels.  There are many calling-all-teachersgood and worthwhile projects to choose from (including those offered by people and places of course!) but there are also many pitfalls to avoid, and most students are unaware that volunteering opportunities that sound great may be very different in reality.  My talk involves getting students to think critically about different types of volunteering experiences, looking for possible pitfalls and working out what questions they should ask to avoid them.  I want to encourage them to volunteer, not put them off, so we also consider what good and worthwhile volunteering experiences might look like.  The aim is to give students questions to ask so that any volunteering they do is of value not only to themselves but also to the projects where they work.

The schools I have gone into so far have all been very appreciative of the talks I have given – some of their feedback comments are given below.  However I am finding that I can only easily get into schools where I have a personal connection . . . and I’ve now run out of schools to go to!  I believe these are important issues that all students should be aware of and I would like to get into more schools to spread the message.  So I am wondering whether any of you would be able to introduce me to schools or colleges where you have connections.  I am willing to travel to schools and colleges in the UK to give the talk for free – it lasts an hour and fits most easily into a school’s general studies or critical thinking programme.  If you are able to help please email me – dianne@travel-peopleandplaces.co.uk.  Thank you for your help. Here’s a flyer for my presentation  schools-presentation-title-slide-people-and-places

‘Dianne’s talk was fascinating.  It offered a very complete picture of the highs (and lows!) of volunteering abroad, with a sting in the tale which was revelatory for the Sixth Form audience.  Dianne was very frank about the pitfalls that are all too easy to fall into – dodgy orphanages and unscrupulous charity packages that rob both volunteers and the communities – and she also outlined how to recognise good volunteering experiences that are beneficial to both sides.  The talk encouraged students to be critical and reflective.  Recommended.’  (Head of Sixth Form)

‘The talk was helpful.  The talk alerted me to things I didn’t know before.  I had no idea that some situations can be fabricated for the ‘benefit’ of volunteers.  It was shocking but incredibly useful.’  (Eliza, year 13 student)

‘The talk was very interesting.  It really helped me see how good gap year volunteering could be for me and for the country I went to IF I prepared and thought about what the country needed and what I could do best.’ (Simon, year 13 student)

‘Although I’m not interested in volunteering at this stage, I now realise how careful you have to be.  It’s too easy to be tricked into thinking that what you’re seeing is the real thing.  A gap year like this is expensive.  I’d want to make sure my money is going into something useful.’  (Bethan, year 13 student)

 

 

please don’t let negative press put you off volunteering

Sunday, December 11th, 2016

people and places was founded to make volunteering a better experience for volunteers and the communities they work with – we decided the best way to campaign for better was through example.

We believe in the power of well matched and well prepared volunteers – we believe the overwhelming majority of people want to do good….but we also see the damage being done in communities where poorly thought out, managed and monitored programmes are being run. We believe volunteers and the communities they seek to serve are often exploited – and they deserve BETTER.

Our plan was always to campaign FOR not AGAINST

but

….and it’s a big but….. (more…)

to campaign or not to campaign …

Friday, September 30th, 2016

TO CAMPAIGN OR NOT TO CAMPAIGN – WHY I HAVE DECIDED TO GET INVOLVED

Dianne

Dianne

by volunteer programme advisor Dianne Ashman

As you will know, there are two connecting strands to the work

people and places does.  We send volunteers on placements where their skills and experience have been carefully matched to local needs, and we campaign for responsible practice in volunteer tourism – and both these categories have been reflected in awards people and places have won, for Best Volunteer Organisation and

Best for Responsible Tourism Campaigning.

Up until now I have preferred to focus my time and energy on the volunteering side of things, helping our local partners identify needs and helping to prepare volunteers to do their bit to meet these needs.  I have not wanted to get involved in the campaigning side of our work as I am personally uncomfortable with the rather negative and critical connotations of some forms of campaigning (not necessarily ours) and I prefer to focus on the positives of trying to make our volunteer placements as successful as possible for all concerned.  However I have always taken an interest in the issues raised through our campaigning, particularly those involving children and child protection.  I have therefore followed with interest all the publicity around the negative impact of volunteers working in, and foreigners supporting, children in orphanages.  One of the articles published as part of a recent ‘blogging blitz’ on the dangers of orphanage tourism really made me think.  The writer of the article was talking specifically about student volunteers going to orphanages as part of a gap year experience, and he made the point that we are wrong to criticise these young people for taking part in a misguided form of volunteering because we have never taught them that it’s an inappropriate thing to do.  As a teacher that really struck a chord, and fits in exactly with my views – I don’t want to criticise bad practice but I do want to raise awareness about what some of the issues are and how to make good choices when volunteering or supporting people in developing countries.

 In fact, having once thought this, I now feel it would be irresponsible of me to know something about the issues and not to spread the word.

“The challenge is certainly not to stop supporting children in developing countries – the need has not decreased – but to make sure we are doing this in ways that genuinely help and are not designed simply to make us feel good – and that requires real thought.”

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